February Blog Carnival Wrap-Up

Tabletop Terrors

administrator

Our month of hosting the RPG Blog Carnival has come to end, and it was fantastic.  There were a ton of fantastic contributions.

The topic was rethinking encounters, including rethinking encounter mechanics, making encounters more memorable, and more.

Be sure you check out these amazing contributions to the RPG Blog Carnival:

 

Jeff at the RPG Circus hit on the topic of encountering house rules.

http://www.rpgcircus.com/node/281

 

Mark from Inspiration Strikes did a great piece on thinking of encounters as scenes, giving some excellent examples.

http://inspstrikes.blogspot.com/2017/02/nuts-bolts-106-rpg-blog-carnival.html

 

Clark Timmins did a wonderful piece with an insightful history on how encounters have evolved over the years since their birth.

https://rpggeek.com/blogpost/62365/encounters

 

Johnn Four did a great article with an encounter building recipe that you don’t want to miss.

https://roleplayingtips.com/tools/encounter-building-tool/

 

Vance from Leicester’s Ramble created an inventive encounter using a Wikiipedia article (and provides a great lesson on acting when inspiration strikes).

http://leicestersramble.blogspot.com/2017/02/tabletop-terrors-is-hosting-this-months.html

 

Eli Kurtz did a fantastic article using the exact method that we laid out, and created an immersive encounter over at Mythic Gazetteer.

http://mythicgazetteer.com/rpg-blog-carnival-vosserlin/

 

Another inspiring contribution from Mark at Inspiration Strikes, who makes scene exits an important part of encounters.

http://inspstrikes.blogspot.com/2017/02/nuts-bolts-107-rpg-blog-carnival-exit.html

 

Johnn Fourr also did a stellar article on how to make encounters more intense.

https://roleplayingtips.com/gm-techniques/make-encounters-intense/

 

Phil from Tales of a GM did an invaluable article on building improvised encounters that is a must read.

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6231

 

Gonzalo of Codex Anathema whipped up a fantastic article on re-engineering encounters and making them more memorable.

https://codexanathema.wordpress.com/2017/02/26/5-ideas-to-re-engineer-your-encounters/

 

Vance from Leicester’s Ramble also put together a useful matrix for tracking multiple groups in an encounter.

https://leicestersramble.blogspot.com/2017/02/an-encounter-matrix-for-multiple.html

 

And finally, Phil from Tales of a GM did a wonderful follow-up to his improvised encounter piece discussing the ‘where’ and ‘when’ of encounters, and why it matters.

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6304

 

And, if you missed it, check out our article, about getting encounter ideas immediately. http://tabletopterrors.com/dd-encounter-creation-get-ideas-immediately/

 

Thanks again for all of the support, and please comment below with any insights you might have after reading any of these magnificent articles.

Until next time, may your dice roll high.

 

 

 

Related Posts

25 comments

Hi,

Many thanks for your kind comments about my articles. As you know, my series is far from complete. I will try to post links to additional posts here, rather than at the launch post.

You certainly received a good selection of entries. I love how the Blog Carnival brings together bloggers.

All the best
Phil

Hi,

Back already with my third contribution to the topic of improv encounters. After dealing with the When and Where, I moved on to the Who of an encounter, possibly the most important question. This topic is so broad, that my third essay only deals with the Player-facing aspects of the GMC:
– Role
– Description
– Name

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6355

There is a lot more parts to come, but I shall take a week off now to write for the March Carnival.

Many thanks for hosting once again
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Great round-up guys! Thanks for hosting the carnival.

Hi,

Back again, this time with the fourth instalment. This really is a companion piece to part 3, as part 4 completes my look at GMCs with a review of the GM-focused aspects of the character. These are not details to tell the Players, rather guidelines for the GM’s portrayal of the GMC:

– Personality
– Goals
– Hooks

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6485

Strong aspects here can produce dynamic GMCs and reinforce the sandbox nature of the setting.

Thanks again for such a thought-provoking topic.

Happy Gaming
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hello again,

Yes, the series rolls along. I have now posted the fifth instalment. Part 5 presents another look at the Who of an encounter, this time exploring the faceless opposition which the Heroes cannot reason with. Broadly, this covers:
Animals
Natural opposition
Magical/Technological opponents

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6518

I plan to take a break from the series next week, but there will be several more essays through April.

Thank you again for picking such a productive topic
Phil

Hello again,

After a short break, the Improv Encounters series rolls along again. I have just posted part 6, where I explore the question of What is happening in the encounter. This is a combination of set dressing, plot advancement and story development. Of all the encounter questions, this is the most important:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6627

Thanks again for such a great topic
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hi,

Back again for another instalment. Part seven answers the Why of an encounter, the last of the the story element questions. This essay looks more to the metagaming reasons for including an encounter in the game. I cover plot, background and fun as reasons to run an encounter:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6670

I will take a break next week, but there remain a couple more essays in this fascinating topic.

All the best
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hello again,

After a short break, I am back to the Improv Encounters series. This has now reached part 8, the contests. These mechanical contests are often at the heart of an RPG scene:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6827

I look at three basic types, with a few suggestions for varying your options.

There is yet more to come on this topic.

Happy Gaming
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hi,

Wow, I am making this a habit.

Anyway, I have just posted the ninth part in my Improv Encoutner series, begun as part of your hosting of the Blog Carnival. This essay deals with those encounters lacking a mechanical contest. Not every scene needs to involve rolling dice, fun as that is.

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6868

I am taking another break next week, this time to contribute to the May Blog Carnival. However, there are more essays to come in this series.

Happy Gaming
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hi,

Back again with another instalment of my long-running series.

After a busy weekend, I finally have the time to notify you about the tenth essay in the series. Part 10 of my Improv Encounter series offers three ways to weave together multiple contests in an encounter. As with so much of being a GM, this is another case of everything in moderation:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=6952

How would you handle multiple encounters in a scene?

Happy Gaming
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hi,

Here I am again. After another break, I finally posted part 11 to my Improv Encounters Series.

This essay presents advice about how to run an improvised contest. I found four main elements to the task, and explored each on in turn.

http://talesofagm.com/?p=7170

Thanks again for hosting
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hi there,

Nearing the end of this series, but not quite yet.

Part 12 explores the closing of a scene, another important skill for a GM. Improv games tend to run fast, so the GM should jump quickly out of a scene once the goal has been achieved, and then catapult the Heroes into the next exciting scene:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=7304

I’m not making any promises, but the series might just conclude next week.

Thanks again for hosting
Phil

Hello again,

Yeah, it was too much to hope for. My summary essay ballooned in length, which was no surprise to anyone. Thus, next week really should be the end of the series.

This week I posted part 13, which summarizes the series in terms of the plot. To present an interesting challenge to the Players, the GM often needs to push forward the plot. This is true for improv GMs, too. Here are a few ways to help an improv GM keep the plot moving:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=7369

So, only one more to go.

Happy Gaming
Phil

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

[…] As February has finished, Tabletop Terrors have posted a summary article. […]

Hi,

Here I am for the last time, with the fourteenth and final instalment of my improv encoutners series. Part 14 presents a second overview of the series, but with the focus on the Players:

http://talesofagm.com/?p=7454

This has been a lot of fun to write, so thank you again for choosing such a great topic.

All the best
Phil

Leave a Comment